Air Cooled Condensers (ACC)

ENEXIO is the inventor of the ACC

ENEXIO - as the inventor of the ACC - has played a leading role in the evolution of this technology. We are known for our comprehensive expertise in the field of cooling technology and we offer- the whole range of services for dry cooling systems.

1935 - Development of first Air Cooled Condenser

In 1935, Otto Happel, in co-operation with the engineer Dr. Kurt Lang, began developing Air Cooled Condensers for stationary steam turbines. The start-up of the first ACC serving a steam turbine at the Prosper mine in Essen, Germany was in 1939.

A PROUD PART OF OUR HERITAGE
The leading market position of ENEXIO in the field of plant cooling is partly due to its thorough command of both cooling processes. It is a well-known fact that experience pays off. For decades, ENEXIO has been building cooling systems all over the world, covering everything from the construction of new systems to the enhancement, maintenance and optimization of existing systems, always to the highest quality standards and incorporating the latest findings from its own research and development programes.

Two types of design are available

Classic ACC

Classic ACC

InAIR

InAIR

Air Cooled Condensers (ACC)

The Air Cooled Condenser belongs to the dry cooling systems. In direct dry cooling, steam from the steam turbine passes through air-cooled fin tubes. The condensate is not in contact with the cooling air.

Air Cooled Condenser

Roof Construction

Steam from the turbine is discharged into a steam duct and flows to a fin tube bundle in which it is condensed.

The A-frame tube bundle is mounted on a platform carried by a steel or concrete structure. Fans integrated in the platform structure below the fin-tube bundle draw ambient air and discharge it along the fin tubing for cooling. The cooling air absorbs the heat of condensation from the steam. The hot air leaves the facility along the outside surface of the fin tube bundle.

This configuration is used mainly in:

  • Fossil fuel fired power plants
  • Combined cycle power plants
  • Large waste-to-energy facilities (> 20 MW)
  • Co-generation plants